Friday, July 13, 2012

PHTHALATES in products can cause diabetes and obesity.



PHTHALATES is a hidden chemical used in products such as  “perfumes, scented lotions, food packaging and even synthetic leathers” has been found, that exposure to Phthalates Correlates with Obesity and Diabetes in Men and in Women. Some studies also report effects of phthalates on fertility, and sexual development.

The universe and humanity evolved in a milieu of earthly chaos, therefore, this follow-up on the study reported today on CNN is not to scandalize and prove that the good-old-days were better - they were not. It is intended to find how today’s consumers can prevent PHTHALATES contamination given the increased threat that if the government regulates industries jobs will be lost and the economy will suffer. The website Coming Clean has several links that can help reduce contamination and exposure.

As per Our Stolen Future. Org “for several decades phthalates use is widespread worldwide in softeners of plastics, oily substances in perfumes, additives to hairsprays, lubricants and wood finishers. That new car smell, which becomes especially pungent after the car has been sitting in the sun for a few hours, is partly the pungent odor of phthalates volatilizing from a hot plastic dashboard. In the evening's cool they then condense out of the inside air of the car to form an oily coating on the inside of the windshield.”


Organizations:

Phthalates in building products: Healthy Contact: Bill Walsh, 202-232-4108, bill@healthybuilding.net

Phthalates in cosmetics: Coming, 
Contact: Bryony Schwan, 406-543-3747, swan@womenandenvironment.org



Phthalates in medical devices:Health Care Without Harm, 
Contact: Stacy Malkan, 202-234-0091, ext. 14, smalkan@hcwh.org



Phthalates in nail polish:Environmental Working Group, 
Contact: Mike Casey, 202-667-6982, mcasey@ewg.org


Phthalates in toys:
Greenpeace
Contact: Lisa Finaldi, lisa.finaldi@dialb.greenpeace.org


Websites:

The Our Stolen Future 
 
and 
 Health Care Without Harm  and
 The 2001 Centers for Disease Control report on body burden monitoring.




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