Monday, September 24, 2018

HOW TO SHOW AND NOT TELL

Showing and not telling offers an undeniable appreciation of a protagonist's feelings, purpose, and reasons but is difficult to carry out. 
As a research analyst, and later as a columnist, my focus was facts. Also, books filled with a minutia of information to build volume annoy me.  But, novels are not technical guides nor reports, so I am learning how to show not tell. Not to limit the protagonist’s involvement, emotions and setting with a scarcity of detail while not dragging the story into a mountain of verbosity. 
For example, in The Sylph’s Tale, when Haya demands “Take me back” and “use wings” Ayekah says “no wings,” even though he realizes that she fears her people but without her, he loses all. To describe a hero's struggle and uncover passions became magical and compelled me to dig deep into who characters are and how experiences influence them and their reality. 
My readers complain that THE SYLPH'S TALE is too short. I agree and love that my readers care. Their observations are helping me to improve the next book of the series VIRGINS.
Here is a great article by K.M. WEILAND3 Tips for Improving Show, Don’t Tell

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